Seated: John Cutrone, director of the Arthur and Mata Jaffe Center for Book Arts at FAU's Wimberly Library; left: Carol Hixson, dean of University Libraries at FAU; and Ingrid Schindall, current artist in residence. Photo: Courtesy Florida Atlantic University

Seated: John Cutrone, director of the Arthur and Mata Jaffe Center for Book Arts at FAU’s Wimberly Library; left: Carol Hixson, dean of University Libraries at FAU; and Ingrid Schindall, current artist in residence. Photo: Courtesy Florida Atlantic University

J dropcapan Engoren, of tribpub.com writes in Sun-Sentinal.com about Ingrid Schindall, a new artist in residence at Florida Atlantic University’s (FAU) Arthur and Mata Jaffe Center for Book Arts, who is taking an algal spin on papermaking.

A graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art, Ms. Schindall studied printmaking with a concentration in book arts. At FAU she hopes to explore new techniques in paper and printmaking working with seaweed and a macroalgae called Chaetomorpha to make paper at the beach. In preparation for this project, she has been growing the algae for months.

Ingrid Schindall plans to use Chaetomorpha to make paper at the beach.

Ingrid Schindall plans to use Chaetomorpha to make paper at the beach.

Jaffe Center director John Cutrone said, “We experience a new kind of energy with each new Salzberg (artist in residence) and I can’t wait to begin working with Ingrid. She’s done amazing things since opening IS Projects in Fort Lauderdale and has been at the forefront of building a community built around paper making, printing and bookbinding.”

Part of Ms. Schindall’s project is to produce an artist book edition entitled Tidal, which will be created from handmade paper and include imagery, monologues and prose poems, short texts about life and the architecture of thought. “Tidal probes the stream of consciousness and our relationship, as humans, to the ocean,” she wrote. Her vision is to compare the ebb and flow of thoughts to those of the tides. Algae will connect papermaking and performance to the ocean.

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